When I want, I can be crafty, but I am not the mom out there doing all sorts of elaborate crafts for every holiday with my kids. The boys and I like to create, but super-planned out activities just make all of us stressed by the end. And stressing out over the message of Easter doesn’t sound like a good plan. The Cross and the Resurrection are all about reflecting—not doing—so we like to keep our focus on that, as well.

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With all of that being said, we do enjoy a few meaningful activities around Easter that help our children understand the sacrifice Jesus made and the miracle of His resurrection. Children are often very visual or hands-on learners, so simple activities can be very helpful in bringing the last days of Jesus and His act of salvation for us to life.

Here are a few of our favorite meaningful Easter week activities…

Feet-washing
When Jesus washed the feet of His disciples just before His crucifixion, He was taking the lowest place possible in that culture to show them He came to serve. Taking the time to sit in the kitchen or bathroom and wash each child’s feet while telling them the story found in John 13 will be more memorable than just reading it from the Bible alone! And it is very significant for me as a parent as I remember God’s calling for me to serve my family with love.

Resurrection Rolls
This is my kids’ favorite Easter activity and it really is pretty easy. All you need are large marshmallows, crescent rolls, melted butter, and a cinnamon-sugar mixture. The kids can roll the marshmallows in butter, then cinnamon sugar. Wrap each dipped marshmallow in a crescent roll, tucking all edges in and sealing tightly. Bake according to the package instructions or at 400º for 15 minutes.

When they come out of the oven, let them cool for a minute, and then cut one open to show your kids the surprise—the marshmallow has disappeared! And this point, you can explain the marshmallow represents Jesus, the butter and cinnamon sugar represent the oils and spices used to prepare His body for burial, and the crescent roll represents the tomb. When the “tomb” is open, Jesus is not there because He has risen! My boys request this Easter activity every single year!

Singing hymns
There are so many beautiful hymns about about both the cross and the resurrection. We love music in our house and children learn well through music, so hymns are a very meaningful way to reflect and celebrate the love of our Savior. Some of my favorites include Jesus Paid It All and In Christ Alone. Pick ones you are a familiar with or that have special meaning to you.

Easter art time
A great way to understand what your kids think about Jesus’ death and resurrection is to have them draw or paint what they remember about the passion of Christ. They may choose the three crosses on the hill, the Last Supper, the empty tomb, or something entirely different. Leave this as open-ended as possible unless they ask for help or ideas. And allow time to discuss their art and the thoughts behind it. This is a great activity for Saturday of Easter weekend.

Watching the sun rise together on Easter morning
I know, who wants to get up earlier than they have to, right?! But there is something special about sunrise on that particular day of the year. Remembering the risen Son while watching the rising sun is a fabulous way to start your Resurrection Sunday. Nothing fancy required (except maybe coffee), just a memorable moment with your family.

I want to challenge you to make the week leading up to Resurrection Sunday less busy and more intentional. There are lots of activities you could do, but just pick a few that fit your family and allow for age-appropriate reflection and discussion!

Erin finds joy in her life as a Jesus-follower, doctor’s wife, mama to three handsome guys, writer at Home with the Boys, and co-founder of The MOB Society. She has a passion for running, healthy living, fashion, and encouraging families to form strong bonds based on faith! You can find her on TwitterFacebookInstagram, and Pinterest!

Comments

  1. Kristi Longino says:

    Erin,
    I love these ideas you posted. So simple yet so incredibly meaningful.

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