Pink ribbons are everywhere, stirring our awareness and reminding us of the realities of breast cancer. And while the focus is on breast cancer, the truth is that cancer in any form disrupts life.

A few years ago, my dad was feeling badly. By Christmas, he wasn’t himself and he didn’t look so good. Within weeks, my sister delivered the news: “Daddy has cancer.”

As bad news washed over me this is the only thought I could think:

God is still God.

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That sentence—my gut level response to cancer’s grand disruption of life—saturated my mind. Perhaps deep down I wanted to freak out but instead of tears or overwhelming worry, I just kept thinking, God is still God.

That sentence was my lifeline.

The very worst thing I can imagine is that one day I wake up and God isn’t there, He isn’t in charge, and I’m left to myself to figure out life.

I’m thankful that my worst-case scenario is an impossibility. Immanuel, God with us, must live up to His name.

In the face of uncertainty, He is what we can be sure of.

That’s all we’ve got folks.

God.

God, who does not abandon us.

God, who is never disrupted but is sovereign in all things.

God, who is with us.

God, who is still God on our darkest days.

Here’s what He says: “I will lead the blind by ways they have not known, along unfamiliar paths I will guide them; I will turn the darkness into light before them and make the rough places smooth. These are the things I will do; I will not forsake them.” Isaiah 42:16.

I am grateful for that moment—that four-word life-sustaining sentence that the Holy Spirit planted in my mind on a day when cancer disrupted my life.

What have you learned from an experience with cancer? Is there a scripture that gave you courage or comforted you?

Amy Jacobs is a marketing strategist for the magazine and young adult ministries of LifeWay. In her spare time, she blogs at Gather and Build.

Comments

  1. I lost my mom to cancer 2 years ago, my uncle last week and my aunt passed of it this morning. What a timely blog for me to read. God is still God and while I am terribly broken right now, I’m thankful I have that to hold on to.

    • Carey,
      Mercy, what a hard road you’re walking right now. Thank you for sharing with us. A sweet friend wrote me a note when daddy was sick and said, “Today you know God to be savior, father, and friend. On the other side of this journey you will know Him in new ways, He will become your______, ________, __________.”

      I can fill in those blanks today. I know Him in new ways. I’m praying that the same will be true for you as you keep putting one foot in front of the other.
      x,
      amy

    • I lost my father to lymphoma in 2007 and my husband to a malignant brain tumor in 2009. Through it all, God sustained me. When my husband was first diagnosed, the verse that I clung to during my darkest hours was Isaiah 43: “Fear not for I have redeemed you, I have called you by name. When you pass through the waters, I will be with you and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you. When you walk through fire you shall not be consumed and the flame shall not burn you. For, I am the Lord your God, the Holy One of Israel

      I am so thankful for God’s faithfulness. He is still God.

  2. Psalm 121 is the one I turn too. It reassures me that God is still very much in control and cares for me and my loved ones in a way I never could.

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