Horses and the Bible

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“Some trust in chariots. Some trust in horses. But we trust in the Lord our God.” Psalm 20:7, NIrV

Each week this summer, I am hoping to do a themed week with my kids. This week our theme was HORSEYS, at my 2-year-old’s request. As I outlined on my personal blog, we did lots of crafts, read books, and danced to music all about horseys.

But I also wanted to touch on where horses are in the Bible. I wasn’t sure how much I would find – aren’t there mostly donkeys in the Bible? And are donkeys horses? – but there are a few good instances!

  • Pharaoh’s army chased the Israelites on horses when they left Egypt (we had a good coloring page of this in our Gigantic Coloring Book of Bible Stories – love that thing!)
  • When Elijah is lifted to heaven in a whirlwind, there is a chariot of fire and horses of fire (2 Kings 2:11).
  • King Solomon had 12,000 horses. Can we even imagine that many horses? (1 Kings 4:26)
  • In the Book of Esther, Mordecai rose a horse through Susa when he was honored by the king.
  • And of course, and most exciting, when Jesus rides victorious He’ll be riding a white horse! (Revelation 19:11)

Any of these biblical stories could be told and made into a craft to go along with a horsey-themed week at your house. And Psalm 20:7 makes an awesome memory verse for the week.

Stay tuned for more in this series as the summer goes on!

Real Men Aren’t Afraid to Carry Bibles by G.G. Mathis

This post is part of our monthly series encouraging leaders and parents of preteens. You’ll find more information and a great curriculum at the FLYTE blog

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source: giratikanon

Kelton’s parents gave him a Bible for his eleventh birthday, four months ago. He’s never taken it out of the box.

Jaden brings his Bible to church, slams it on the table, and sits the rest of the hour with his arms crossed.

Barrett, certain he won’t need it at home, leaves his Bible at church on Sundays.

Hang around preteen boys at church, and you’ll discover that these behaviors, though undesirable, are not uncommon.  You have a unique opportunity to help boys (and girls) recognize the value of God’s Word. Here’s how:

Use navigational aids. Remember that some of your preteens are new to church, and a thick book arranged in neither alphabetical nor numerical order is hard to navigate. Assure boys, “It’s always OK to use the table of contents!” Frequently and briefly review the significance of chapter and verse numbers.

Use Bibles every session. Technology makes it possible for teachers to flash verses on a screen, use search engines to find them, or spit out a printout of a Bible passage. Don’t forget to encourage preteens to experience the Bible the traditional way—hands-on and minds on! (You can add technological techniques as kids improve in Bible-handling expertise.)

Use affirmation. Privately recognize boys who bring their own Bibles to church. Encourage them to show you what Bible translation they are using, as well as the maps, dictionaries, or other study helps it contains. As time and conversation permit, explain which study helps are your favorites and why.

Use natural preteen curiosity. How do you get boys to use their Bibles in between Sundays? Trick them, of course! Bait boys with bits and bites of Bible stories about heroes, battles, spies, and God’s supernatural power. Tell enough of the story to pique their interest, then tell boys where they can read the rest.

Use your Bible! Let boys see you carrying, reading, and respecting your Bible. Tell them about meaningful passages you read and how they helped you make it through a tough week. Keep up the habit of marking and memorizing Scriptures and sharing them with preteens when you teach.

What suggestions do you have for making preteens excited about the Bible?  

G.G. Mathis teaches preteens at Forest Park Baptist Church in Joplin, Missouri.

June ParentLife Giveaway Winners

Congratulations to Jeff D., Jonathan G., Crystal, Mary K., Janet B., Peter, Leslie B., Anthony P., and Brenda S. — the winners of our June giveaway!
 

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IllStudyBibleforKids2.jpgEach of these readers won a copy of the new Illustrated Study Bible for Kids by Holman Bible Publishers. Thank you Holman for donating the extra copies to give away!

 

Keep checking our blog for our July giveaway … coming soon!

June ParentLife Giveaway

Is your child ready for a study Bible of his very own? Check out the new Illustrated Study Bible for Kids by Holman Bible Publishers.

 

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Now available in pink and brown simulated leather editions, the popular Illustrated Study Bible for Kids offers a fresh and exciting approach to Bible reading among children. It features the complete text of the popular Holman Christian Standard Bible translation plus dozens of full-color illustrations, maps, and reconstructions. Also included are easy-to-read study helps like The Ten Commandments for Kids, How to Have a Quiet Time, Test Your Bible Knowledge, and a Bible Dictionary for Kids.

ParentLife has two Illustrated Study Bible for Kids (one in pink and one in brown) to give away during the month of June. Everyone* who posts a comment on our blog in June will automatically be entered to win!

*LifeWay employees are not eligible for this giveaway. Multiple comments do not increase chances of winning.

 What features do you look for in a Bible for your child? What is most important to you?

 

Where Do You Go for Parenting Advice?

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Have you seen the latest research on parenting? A study released by LifeWay Research, the research arm of LifeWay Christian Resources, conducted a survey of 1,200 parents with children under age 18. The study reveals that most parents are consistently looking for guidance to help them be better parents. But where do they look to better themselves? Research shows that parents primarily depend upon their own experience to guide them in their decisions as a parent. Only about 14 percent of parents look to the Bible as a source of parenting advice. Even Christian parents look to the Bible at a low rate.

But parents do express the need for help. Ninety-two percent of parents say they need encouragement in parenting. These numbers show the great need for parents to have support, understanding, and mentoring in the task of parenting. But many times parents are too busy, stressed, or even embarrassed at their failures to seek help. So the question is: How can we make time in our schedules to form relationships with other parents where we are vulnerable, willing to listen, and use our weaknesses to help others?

I was challenged this weekend on our Sunday School class retreat to do just this — to see my story with its successes and failures as a gift from God. As parents, this is so important as we face the uncertainties and questions that come with parenting our kids. I want to challenge you to do the same and to be willing to impact other parents in your life — to be an encourager, to be available to follow God’s plan for your life, and to be real with your challenges as parents.

ParentLife is so grateful to be a small part of your parenting journey. When we developed our slogan — Encouraging and Equipping Parents — we recognized how important these tasks are in helping parents carry our their sacred calling as parents. We hope this blog and each issue of ParentLife will encourage and equip you to be a better parent.

Do you agree that parents need more encouragement? Where do you find encouragement as a parent? Let us know how we can better partner with you in your parenting journey.