Celebrating Easter with ParentLife

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source: Tatters via Flickr Creative Commons

Need some advice or ideas for leading your kids through the Holy Week? Here are all the Easter posts we’ve done here on the ParentLife blog over the last six years.

Preparing for Easter by William Summey (2009)

“We went shopping this week to buy some Easter clothes for our family. This is one way many families prepare for Easter.”

The Real Reason by Jodi Skulley (2009)

“I was especially excited about this Easter since it would be Jack’s first Easter. We had a busy weekend planned. We were celebrating with my side of the family on the day before Easter with an Easter waffle brunch. …”

The Story of Jesus: Easter Activities for the Whole Family by Christi McGuire (2011)

“Challenge older children to create a song, activity, or game to go with the Bible passage. Help younger children retell the Bible story in a few simple sentences and create motions to a song.”

Not about the Eggs by Jessie Weaver (2011)

“I have nothing against Easter egg hunts and baskets and dresses and Cadbury cream eggs are one of my favorite annual treats. But it feels like just another holiday we’ve morphed into a reason to buy cards, candy, and clothes.”

A Preschooler’s Easter Dictionary (2012)

“Focus on what the Bible says as you talk to your child. Think about some unfamiliar words that your child will hear at Easter. Use these brief definitions.”

Helping Children Grasp the Resurrection by Jessie Weaver (2012)

“I want to focus on the Lenten holiday just as much—if not more!—than we followed along with the Christmas story, crafting and reading our Bible every day for a month. Belief in the resurrection is what makes our faith different from anyone else’s.”

Pausing for Passover by Michelle Lippincott (2012)

“Your family may choose to use some or all of the elements from a traditional Passover. Don’t get so caught up in ‘doing it right’ that you lose the meaning of this feast.”

Easter Crafts (2013)

“All of the chicks and bunnies floating around in Springtime are cute, but they don’t teach about the true Easter and the Resurrection. Here are some craft ideas I dug up that do help teach that to your child!”

Last-Minute Ideas for Easter Weekend (2013)

Four quick ideas.

Seeing, Hearing, Touching, Believing: Leading Your Children to Experience Christ’s Resurrection (2014)

“Parents are scared of telling their kids about blood, sin, crucifixion, murder. But as Christ’s resurrection is the absolute central truth of our faith, it’s important to start teaching it to children as early as possible.”

What to Do with Leftover Plastic Eggs? (2014)

“I keep finding empty plastic eggs laying on the floor. While I hate not to just save them for next year, we don’t actually fill our own baskets.”

Making Easter Dinner in Advance by Jessie Weaver (2014)

“I’m preparing to host them for Easter dinner in a few weeks. And today it struck me that JUST MAYBE I should go ahead and get some things ready so I won’t be so stressed on Resurrection Day.”

 

Weekend Links

Did you read or write something great this week? Leave us a link in the comments!

 

What a Teacher Wants to Tell You, the Parent by Ashley Terpstra

What a Teacher Wants to Tell You as a Parent
source: Duke University Archives via Flickr Creative Commons

  1. The reason we give homework is not to make your life harder as a parent. In order to transfer their knowledge, it is important that they practice independently what we are learning that week. We have a limited amount of time to practice during a given lesson. Ideally, homework is something we, the teachers, think that they can do on their own without help.
  2. School isn’t like it was when we were young anymore. Current educational research trends support children taking more charge in their learning. We don’t do math by teaching them algorithms (one certain method) anymore either. We KNOW that it is difficult to watch your children struggle with their learning, but it is helping them learn how to think rather than just digest and spit out information without really learning anything.
  3. The teacher is on your side! And your child’s side! You are your child’s first and most important teacher. You are the expert on your child, and we are the experts on teaching. It is so important to be on the same team. Adversarial parent-teacher relationships are only detrimental to your child, and no one wants that. Keep your child’s teacher informed. If your child had a bad morning, communicate that with the teacher! If we know what’s coming, we will be more ready to help your child jump that hurdle and move on with the day.
  4. When your child is in our class for the year, they become “our kids.” Being a teacher is like having 20 children that are the same age. It can be difficult sometimes to be a teacher. My whole life is encompassed by these children. If they have a bad day, I have a bad day. I may have high expectations of their behavior and their effort, but if someone messes with MY kids, I will take up for them every time. Here is my pinky swear–I honestly want your child to reach his highest potential, to grow to be a whole person, to learn empathy and compassion, and do her best.
  5. Teachers are real people. They are dealing with person struggles, heartaches, illnesses, and the plethora of everyday life events. They put this aside to teach and empower your children. Give them the benefit of a doubt. They are doing their absolute best for your child.

 

Ashley Terpstra is a first-grade teacher in Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

 

Weekend Links

 

As always, if you’ve read or written something great and relevant to Christian parenting, please leave a link for us in the comments.

Faith That Sticks {GIVEAWAY}

I am a firm believer in teaching children to love reading at a young age. As soon as my children were old enough to maintain eye contact, I was reading to them. They loved listening to my voice and looking at the bright colors. Soon they were big enough to turn the pages on their own and understand the story. Before I knew it, they were sounding out words and reading me stories all by themselves!

We rarely went anywhere without a book or two tucked in a bag, ready to bring out at a moment’s notice. As a result, I raised two kids who still value reading and love to immerse themselves in a book—so much so that when my son started to drive he kept getting lost. He had spent his riding in the car time reading books and therefore he didn’t know how to get to basic places like the store or his school.

To help build the value of reading in your child, check out the new line of Faith That Sticks books by Tyndale House Publishers. Filled with faith values and Bible stories, these books not only teach important lessons, but engage the child to understand the story by encouraging parent interaction. The stories also include stickers and activities to help keep children involved and reading the story over and over.

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Enter to win copies of the five latest Faith That Sticks books—just in time for Easter! Or check out the full line of Faith That Sticks products at faiththatsticks.com.

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Friday Links

As always, if you’ve read or written something great this week, leave us a link in the comments!

The Desperate Diva Diaries: Christian Fiction for the Preteen Crowd

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There were the Dork Diaries. The Diary of a Wimpy Kid. And now Angie Spady offers a Christian alternative with a female protagonist: Catie Conrad, star of The Desperate Diva Diaries series.

When Catie asks her journalist father for a sketchbook, she should have known he’d come back with the wrong item. Instead he gives her a diary. Well, maybe she’ll use it.

Thus starts Faith, Friendship, and Fashion Disasters, the first book in the Desperate Diva series, which targets preteen girls ages 8-12. Catie is a typical sixth-grader: her life is full of drama, she loves fashion … and her dad wants to take her to an Indian reservation during her Spring break.

With all 4- and 5-star reviews on Amazon, Faith, Friendship, and Fashion Disasters is a book your daughters will devour. As one reviewer said, “Sometimes I’ll hear parents say, ‘I don’t care what they’re reading, I’m just glad they’re reading something!’ But not all reading material for tweens and middle schoolers is created equal.” Angie Spady gives us a clean, fun book, full of illustrations by Channing Everidge.

The second book in the series, How to Become the Most (un)Popular Girl in Middle School, will be released in May 2015.

How Surviving a Snow Day Is Like Getting through a Spiritual Drought by Jessie Weaver

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First of all, you have to know that I am not talking one snow day. I’m talking two weeks where my elementary-school-aged child has gone to school a grand total of 8.5 hours. She is distraught. I am stir-crazy. My preschooler went once for 2.5 hours. In two weeks! I pay for him to go to school!

I’m reminding myself that this is the consequence of living in a very large county with mountains. And in the midst of my stir-craziness and feeling like I cannot possibly find one more thing in our apartment for my three children to do, I find myself thinking how getting through a fortnight of snow days is an awful lot like finding your way through a spiritual drought.

At first, it’s not so bad. Maybe fun, maybe you do things you don’t normally do. Eat ice cream for breakfast and hot chocolate with lunch; loll in bed for a few extra hours. Forget that these things bring repercussions. After a little while, though, you start to feel desperate. Where can I hide? Why can’t I seem to buckle down and read the Word without distractions? Why does every hour seem so long? Why why WHY is my head swimming with questions God won’t answer?

And then, you approach the end. I am sincerely hoping and praying for a normal, 5-day school week this coming week. (It is March, after all. And the South. Thus it should be SPRING.) And with the knowledge that my kids will be going back to their normal school routines, I want to hold them a little tighter. I enjoy their presence a little more. There is a light at the end of the tunnel, and I see things through that glowing pinprick instead of under a magnifying glass.

When a spiritual drought is ending – when we start to feel God’s presence again, get comfortable in the Word and in prayer – there is a sense of sincere relief. There is growth. There is knowing you learned something during the snowstorm of your soul. You dig out the driveways of your heart and get ready to emerge, better for the journey.

I hope if you’re going through a spiritual drought right now, you’ll remember that there is light and hope. It is coming.

And if you’re going through a season of snow days … my prayers and thoughts are with you.

“Hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit, who has been given to us.” – Romans 5:5

 

photo source: Shawn Carpenter. Used with permission of Flickr Creative Commons. 

Weekend Links

Did you read or write anything great this week? Leave us a link in the comments.

Big Thoughts for Little People – the New App and a Giveaway

Tyndale House Publishers is excited to announce its first children’s app. Released to the iTunes store in January, 2015, the Big Thoughts for Little People app is the perfect companion to the bestselling alphabet book with the same name, written by Dr. Ken Taylor (over 560,000 sold).

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In the app, each letter of the alphabet is accompanied by five unique interactive games designed to teach children letter recognition and beginning word identification skills. Activities include matching games, coloring activities, puzzles, picture comparison, and much more!

The Big Thoughts for Little People app will encourage kids to remember that God has created each of them and the world they live in. This app is a worthwhile investment in any child’s spiritual and educational growth.

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Courtesy of Tyndale House, we have 5 copies of the book Big Thoughts for Little People to give away. It’s a beautifully illustrated, hardcover book that would be wonderful for your kids or to give awy. Enter using Rafflecopter below!

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