New Research: Americans believe in heaven, hell, and a little bit of heresy

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Most Americans believe in heaven, hell, and a few old-fashioned heresies.

Americans disagree about mixing religion and politics and about the Bible. And few pay much heed to their pastor’s sermons or see themselves as sinners.

Those are among the findings of a new study of American views about Christian theology from Nashville-based LifeWay Research. The online survey of 3,000 Americans was commissioned by Orlando-based Ligonier Ministries.

Growing Number of Churches Benefit From Background Checks

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By Aaron Earls NASHVILLE, Tenn.—More than 1-in-5 background checks processed by LifeWay’s program with backgroundchecks.com reveals a serious offense. These numbers are part of the reason a growing number of churches use background checks as a way to better protect those involved in the ministry. After a six-year relationship, the number of churches that say […]

New Research: Americans pray for friends, family but rarely for celebrities or sports teams

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By Bob Smietana NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Americans pray for their friends, families, and sometimes their enemies. They ask for divine help in times of trouble but rarely praise God’s greatness. And they seldom add politicians, nonbelievers, or even their favorite sports team to their prayer lists, according to a new survey from Nashville-based LifeWay Research. […]

SBC pastor salaries not keeping up with inflation

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Compensation for full-time Southern Baptist pastors has not kept pace with inflation over the past two years, while salaries for other full-time ministers and office staff increased at a rate higher than national inflation, according to the SBC Church Compensation Study, an in-depth survey of 12,907 staff members in Southern Baptist churches.

Panelists discuss theological disagreements while agreeing on evangelism need

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Participants in a panel discussion held during the Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting were open about their disagreements concerning theology and evangelism, but agreed about the urgency to evangelize.

The breakfast meeting was sponsored by The Gospel Project and drew more than 500 people for an honest, spirited, and entertaining discussion about how differing views of salvation impact the way Christians do ministry and mission.