Everything I Need to Know I Learned from FUGE

Everything I Need to Know I Learned from FUGE

Melissa and family Melissa Crosby lives in South Asia with her husband and three children.  Melissa is from Nashville, Tennessee.  She served on staff at M-Fuge Charleston 2002, M-Fuge Jacksonville 2003, M-Fuge Nashville 2004, and Centrifuge Panama City Beach 2005.

 

Last week I found myself quoting something I learned years ago while working at Fuge summer camps.  I started thinking about all I had learned during my four summers working for the Lifeway camps.

1. Always own at least 10% of the problem.  At least that much is your own sin, probably more.  Coming into a disagreement with this attitude will help diffuse the situation better and will help you come to a resolution quicker.

2.  Everyone you meet is on a journey with God.  Your goal is to determine where they might be and help them get one step closer.

3. Always be on time.  It might cost you a dollar.

4. A good leader handles a lot more problems than you will ever know about.  Your support and kindness goes a long way to encourage them, even if they aren’t able to tell you.

5. When you stick a group of strong, young, single believers together in such a close setting, someone is going to fall in love!

6. Fuge friends are friends for life.

7.  There are Fugers all over the world doing amazing things for God.  Having worked Fuge connects you to an amazing network.

8. Once a Fuger, always a Fuger.  Unless you got fired for some reason.

9. Working for Fuge provides you with all the bags and jackets you will ever need!

10. Saying that you worked for Fuge gives you an instant credibility.

I’m so thankful for that chapter of my life and for the memories!

A MEGA Announcement

A MEGA Announcement

 

Messy. Hype. Chaotic. Energy. Excitement. Craziness. Competitive. Teamwork. Ridiculous. FUGE CUP.

All words to describe one of the many reasons why people love FUGE Camps, the friendly competition we refer to as MEGA RELAY. If you’ve been to FUGE before, you have experienced Mega Relay and you cannot help but love every single second of its action-packed goodness. Maybe you’ve been carried fireman-style across a field. Maybe you’ve had pudding or baby food poured on your face. Maybe you’ve been forced to whistle ‘Happy Birthday’ with a mouthful of crackers. Maybe you’ve even found yourself stumbling to the ground because you’re so dizzy after spinning around a pool noodle. Regardless of your experiences with Mega Relay, you can’t help but walk away looking forward to the next year when you will get to run it again. It’s that much fun!

This year, for the first time ever, we want to supply you with items for Mega Relay bundled together for one low price! We are excited to announce the Mega Relay Bag! Included in this bag are the following items: a t-shirt, water bottle, buff, bracelet, and face paint. To make this deal even sweeter, we are throwing in a free drawstring bag, which is only available by purchasing this bundle. This is a total value of $35 for only $25 – a savings of $10!

To ensure we get everyone a Mega Relay Bag who wants one this summer, we are asking that group leaders preorder them now. Included in the Parent Pack, found within the Group Leader Information at FUGE.com, is an order form for parents to fill out and give to the Group Leaders. We are asking that only Group Leaders fill out the online order form. Preorders must be completed by May 1, so don’t wait!

Be sure to read the information on the preorder form for more details. If you have any questions, please email fuge@lifeway.com. Check back later or on our facebook and twitter pages for photos!

Good luck this year at Mega Relay! Who knows? You may even win the FUGE Cup!

Link to preorder: http://bit.ly/1fZ73Bg

A sneak peek  — The 2014 MEGA RELAY BAG!

MEGAbag

 

 

 

 

** DISCLAIMER: This MEGA Bag is optional. It is not required that you purchase one in order to participate in Mega Relay at camp. However, we believe it will greatly enhance your MEGA experience.

Help My Unbelief

Help My Unbelief

katiejprof

Today’s guest post comes from Katie Johnson, a FUGE staffer who most recenly served as a Bible Study leader at North Greenville University in 2013. She is currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Theology. Katie loves spending time with family, North Carolina in the fall, and Tarheel basketball. 
 
 
 
And Jesus said to him, “‘If you can’?” All things are possible for one who believes.” Immediately the father of the child cried out and said, “I believe; help my unbelief!” Mark 9:23-24

Webster’s defines belief as this: a feeling of being sure that someone or something exists or that something is true. We place belief in so many things: we believe our car will start when we turn the key,  a chair will hold us up when we sit down, a roller coaster won’t break when we get on. We place our trust in family and friends, but the one thing that all of these things have in common is their tendency to fail. It may not be often but nothing of this world is perfect.

In Mark 9 we find the story of a father asking Christ to cleanse his son of an unclean spirit. I will focus on the statements made by these two men; one by Christ and the other by the father. The father says to Christ, “if you can do anything, have compassion on us and help us”. Christ is surprised by this, it’s as if He was saying, “If I can, are you kidding?” How could he doubt His ability to heal his son and the power that Christ had? He had been displaying it in that area for over a year, but sometimes that’s not enough. We have seen the power of Christ in the Word and in the world, yet we doubt His ability and control over our lives countless times. We are so independent that we believe we can try to take care of things on our own rather than going to God first. The father cries to Jesus, “I believe, help my unbelief”. What an honest man. He believes in Jesus, believes in His power but admits he has doubt. God has never expected us to have perfect faith. There is always going to be some doubt mixed in but Christ assures us that, “All things are possible for one who believes”. So don’t be afraid to admit your doubt to God, He already knows. Confront it, face it head on and ask God to remove it.

Enough is enough.

Enough is enough.

Twenty months ago, I was on the other side of the world kneeling on a scorching metal roof, hammer in hand, overcome with emotion and asking God lots of questions. I was in Sanyati, Zimbabwe, leading a team that was helping to install a new roof on the HIV/AIDS wing of  Sanyati Baptist Hospital. It was late in the week, and the roof was nearing completion. We’d spent that morning inside the hospital, looking into the eyes of those who we’d spent all week laboring on behalf of. We knelt next to rickety hospital beds and prayed with the HIV positive, most of whom had no idea if they’d live to walk out of their hospital rooms. We begged God for healing:  both for restoration of bodies, and for a revival in  souls. “Jesus, come,” was the cry of our hearts.

But, after a weighty several days, I felt defeated. There was too much to do,  too many dying, not enough doctors,  too few resources. In a few days, I was going to return to my embarrassingly comfortable life in the US. The difference I was making seemed minuscule compared to the reality of the issues I was facing. “It’s not enough” played over and over in my mind. Then came the reassurance of the Gospel itself: it is not up to me. There is something that is relentlessly true both in the poverty of Africa and in the poverty of my own sinful heart: the grace of Christ has nothing to do with me, yet it is mine to enjoy.

So, in spite of my limited resources, my finite knowledge, my self-seeking tendencies, and all my other excuses … God is working.  He is working in Africa, and He is working around the globe. He is restoring communities, healing the sick, growing churches,  mending families, bringing hope.

Yes, there is much to be done. He has called the Church to step forward in the name of the broken, sick, and hurting. So, yes, serve your neighbor. Go to the nations. Support missionaries. Speak out for the oppressed. Pray for revival. Marvel at Jesus’ sacrifice.  Make redemption the theme of your days and the Gospel message the absolute focus of your life. It is the most important thing you could ever do.

But let us not become overwhelmed  by what’s before us. The task is great, but our Savior is greater. Let’s not forget what was already finished on the Cross. Let’s rest in the all-sufficient work of Christ. 

sanyatiroof  sanyatiteam

Listen Closely

Listen Closely

haleybiopic

Haley Lavergne participated in the Student Leader Apprentice (SLA) program for two years: 2012 in Nashville, TN and 2013 in Glorieta, NM. She is currently studying at University of Louisiana at Lafayette. In her spare time, you will find her outside in a hammock immersed in a good book or creating art with various mediums.

 

“Welcome to SLA, where questions about the future aren’t allowed and getting thrown outside of your comfort zone is guaranteed.”

Although I wasn’t greeted with these exact words when arriving at Glorieta, they certainly sum up my experience. I arrived asking the Lord to move in mighty ways and left in awe of how He exceeded my expectations. Being quiet and being a friend to listen and encourage was the trend for the entire two weeks. It sounds small because I am a small part of what God did. He doesn’t need me but He chooses to use me. What a beautiful God we serve.  I was given the opportunity to watch God use something as simple as truly listening, in such a huge way as He began to heal hurting people. All the while, I had a front row seat listening to fellow SLAers, staffers, campers, site friends, and most importantly: the Lord. I was continually taken back by our innate desire to be heard and known. It was simultaneously: overwhelming, wonderful, powerful and humbling. SLA’s focus on service leadership taught me how truly listening and serving the people in front of me are crucial.

James 5:16a says, “Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed.” I think much of the healing James talks about also comes from listening. I learned that that’s where ministry happens: in intentional moments packed with sincere love and genuine care for God’s people. Jesus took the time to not only heal people’s physical needs, but He took care of them as human beings with the desire to be loved. He saw desires to be seen, accepted, and deeply known. It went beyond physical healing. He went deeper to care for emotions. He loved past the surface. He loves deep and He loves well. I learned about that at SLA and it is something I am grateful to say I’m still learning.