Everything I Need to Know I Learned from FUGE

Everything I Need to Know I Learned from FUGE

Melissa and family Melissa Crosby lives in South Asia with her husband and three children.  Melissa is from Nashville, Tennessee.  She served on staff at M-Fuge Charleston 2002, M-Fuge Jacksonville 2003, M-Fuge Nashville 2004, and Centrifuge Panama City Beach 2005.

 

Last week I found myself quoting something I learned years ago while working at Fuge summer camps.  I started thinking about all I had learned during my four summers working for the Lifeway camps.

1. Always own at least 10% of the problem.  At least that much is your own sin, probably more.  Coming into a disagreement with this attitude will help diffuse the situation better and will help you come to a resolution quicker.

2.  Everyone you meet is on a journey with God.  Your goal is to determine where they might be and help them get one step closer.

3. Always be on time.  It might cost you a dollar.

4. A good leader handles a lot more problems than you will ever know about.  Your support and kindness goes a long way to encourage them, even if they aren’t able to tell you.

5. When you stick a group of strong, young, single believers together in such a close setting, someone is going to fall in love!

6. Fuge friends are friends for life.

7.  There are Fugers all over the world doing amazing things for God.  Having worked Fuge connects you to an amazing network.

8. Once a Fuger, always a Fuger.  Unless you got fired for some reason.

9. Working for Fuge provides you with all the bags and jackets you will ever need!

10. Saying that you worked for Fuge gives you an instant credibility.

I’m so thankful for that chapter of my life and for the memories!

Enough is enough.

Enough is enough.

Twenty months ago, I was on the other side of the world kneeling on a scorching metal roof, hammer in hand, overcome with emotion and asking God lots of questions. I was in Sanyati, Zimbabwe, leading a team that was helping to install a new roof on the HIV/AIDS wing of  Sanyati Baptist Hospital. It was late in the week, and the roof was nearing completion. We’d spent that morning inside the hospital, looking into the eyes of those who we’d spent all week laboring on behalf of. We knelt next to rickety hospital beds and prayed with the HIV positive, most of whom had no idea if they’d live to walk out of their hospital rooms. We begged God for healing:  both for restoration of bodies, and for a revival in  souls. “Jesus, come,” was the cry of our hearts.

But, after a weighty several days, I felt defeated. There was too much to do,  too many dying, not enough doctors,  too few resources. In a few days, I was going to return to my embarrassingly comfortable life in the US. The difference I was making seemed minuscule compared to the reality of the issues I was facing. “It’s not enough” played over and over in my mind. Then came the reassurance of the Gospel itself: it is not up to me. There is something that is relentlessly true both in the poverty of Africa and in the poverty of my own sinful heart: the grace of Christ has nothing to do with me, yet it is mine to enjoy.

So, in spite of my limited resources, my finite knowledge, my self-seeking tendencies, and all my other excuses … God is working.  He is working in Africa, and He is working around the globe. He is restoring communities, healing the sick, growing churches,  mending families, bringing hope.

Yes, there is much to be done. He has called the Church to step forward in the name of the broken, sick, and hurting. So, yes, serve your neighbor. Go to the nations. Support missionaries. Speak out for the oppressed. Pray for revival. Marvel at Jesus’ sacrifice.  Make redemption the theme of your days and the Gospel message the absolute focus of your life. It is the most important thing you could ever do.

But let us not become overwhelmed  by what’s before us. The task is great, but our Savior is greater. Let’s not forget what was already finished on the Cross. Let’s rest in the all-sufficient work of Christ. 

sanyatiroof  sanyatiteam

Holiday Traditions

Holiday Traditions

Now that December is here, the Christmas spirit is filling the FUGE Camps office. Here are some of our favorite holiday traditions.

Holiday Traditions Blog from Fuge Camps on Vimeo.

The Role of an Adult in the Life of a Teenager

The Role of an Adult in the Life of a Teenager

janas

Today’s guest post comes from one of our favorites,  Jana Spooner.  Jana worked with FUGE for 12 years, and now serves as an associate publisher of women’s books with B&H Publishing Group at LifeWay. Jana is wife to Michael, mom to Abigail, and student ministry volunteer at Central Baptist Hendersonville, TN. She loves all things Texas, coffee, and mexican food.

 

I have spent most of my adult life working with teenagers in some capacity. Sometimes that was Sunday school teacher. Sometimes it was camp staffer. Sometimes it was mentor, worship leader, chaperon, host home mom, lock-in supervisor, homework helper, you name it. I love them.

I love how awkward they are in middle school and how they literally do not stop moving. Ever.

I love how they think they know everything one day and the next day the whole world is a blank slate again.

I love how dramatic they are. Seriously. They are dramatic because everything is important to them. EVERYTHING is SUPER IMPORTANT! Like, OMG…

I love getting texts from them where I have to enlist google to decipher what all the abbreviations mean…IDK what UR talking about…

I’ll be the first one to admit that I feel like an unlikely candidate for student ministry. Suffice it to say, I am not cool. In fact, I am pretty much the opposite of cool. I am not loud or crazy. I’m not silly. I dress conservatively and am fairly reserved most of the time. My kid goes to bed at 8:00 on the dot so my idea of “night life” is limited to Netflix or a good book. And I am perfectly ok with that!

Not only am I not cool, I’m a rule enforcer. At camp, I knock on your door at 6:45 a.m. to make sure you will make it to breakfast on time. I make you drink water and eat vegetables. I don’t let you go back for a second bowl of ice cream. I will shush you.

I don’t make the mistake of thinking I’m cool and that’s why teenagers would like me. So why would they? Because I’m an adult. And they need adults. They need their parents, first and foremost. But even when their parents are godly and loving, they still need other adults. They need people who will love them the way Christ loves them. They need to see what it looks like to live out your faith in your 20’s, 30’s, 40’s and so on. They need to see that a relationship with Christ extends beyond the walls of the church.

They don’t necessarily need a buddy. They have friends speaking all kinds of messages into their lives every day. They don’t need more of that. They need adults who will speak truth. And who will listen. And love them and value them. That’s why it’s ok that I’m not cool. I don’t need to be. That’s not my role. My role is to model a life fully lived for Christ and the Gospel and to spur them on to do the same.

National Tongue Twister Day

Maybe you celebrate it every year, or maybe this is the first you’ve heard of it, but get ready friends, because this Sunday is National Tongue Twister Day!

We’re celebrating a little early here in the office by practicing some tongue twisters ourselves.

Check out our attempts…

 

What’s YOUR favorite tongue twister? Share in the comment section!

Office Tongue Twisters from Fuge Camps on Vimeo.